The oldest hotel in Killarney village marks its 100th anniversary on August 6th, 2003
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Introduction to Minjmendaan
Minjmendaan
is Ojibwe for
"to keep in mind;
to remember"
Native Heritage
Summer 2003
In this issue:

100th Anniversary of Killarney's oldest hotel


Julia Peladeau of the Wapoose family


Michif: Unique language of the Metis people


News from the past:
Golden wedding at
       Killarney, 1899

Pilot rescues  
       fishermen from
       drifting ice, 1940


Remembering Killarney's Angel: Nancy Pitfield


The sad death of Andre Proulx


The Lourdes Grotto of St. Bonaventure's Parish


The Metis sash


Descendants of Ezekiel Solomon reunite


From the cookbook of Josephine Low


The sacred tree

In September 1899, the Manitoulin Expositor reported that Mr. Angus McDonald, the popular proprietor of the Killarney House...says that the tourist trade in his town is very large this season, and that all available accommodation was taken up.
Three months later, Mr. McDonald had the foundation ready for a large addition to the Hotel. It was completed in the spring of 1900.

In May of 1903, a raging fire burned the newly-enlarged hotel to the ground. Only a small amount of furniture and the hotel's piano were saved. Despite an estimated loss of over $10,000 in property and only $3.000 in insurance monies...

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The Killarney hotel, after it was rebuilt in 1903. It still stands,
Julia Peladeau of the Wapoose family
For many years, the family history of Julia Peladeau, foremother oif all the descendants of Andre Proulx and Henry Bateman, has been a mystery. It was known that Julia was of Ojibwe ancestry, and family lore consistently claimed she arrived in Killarney from the Sarnia area, but details of her early life and the names of her ancestors were yet to be discovered.

In the late winter of 2002, this writer obtained Indian Affairs records from the National Archives of Canada that contain information about Julia's life before her family's arrival in Killarney village.

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Photo  courtesy of Killarney Museum.
at the west end of Channel Street.